Saturday, January 12, 2008

Hillary? Why?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but is it not the case that Hillary Clinton faked the sob, the 'iron my shirt' hecklers were plants and New Hampshire appears to have been rigged? Further correct me if it is not the case that many Americans want her to be president. But, then again, what do I know?

20 comments:

  1. Well my heart sinks at the thought of perpetuating the Clinton-Bush dynasty. I hate to think of the Great Republic resembling a banana republic. The democrats must be mad - if she wins and McCain wins, they could blow what ought to be a shoe-in. It's time these useless baby-boomers moved on. I'd really like to think Obama's the real deal.

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  2. With you on the useless boomers, Windbag, I feel it's time we moved on.

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  3. There's a very incisive piece on Clinton and Obama by Charles Krauthammer in today's Washinton Post. If I knew how to link, I'd do it.

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  4. i don't know if you've noticed, Bryan, but your predictions are usually wrong. At the time they make sense and are intelligent & reasonable. My guess is the Jesuits (or Knights of Columbus) read your blog and decide to do the opposite of what you predict.

    So, why not note that it looks like Obama hasn't a chance in hell, and watch his support skyrocket.

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  5. Well, for one thing, Bryan, and in answer to your last question, you claimed to know the other day that I had started a war.

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  6. Hard to tell about the sob. It would be like her if she did. Then again, it could have been real. You're behind the times on the "Iron My Shirt" guys: yes, they were plants - it was a prank for a radio show heard on WBCN 104.1 FM. How exactly, was New Hamshire supposed to have been rigged? Surely you aren't taking a cue here from Dennis Kucinich?

    Finally, yes, many Americans do want her to be President. Some are intent on electing her to Bill's third term. Others are intent on electing a woman. A few even like her policy proposals. Almost as many (if not more), however, are just as intent on making sure she never makes it back into the White House, unless as an occasional dinner guest.

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  7. I think her sob was real. She's realizing how deep the dislike of her is among some voters and it hurts. She barely prepped for Iowa b/c she thought she was a shoe-in. Moi, I'm for Obama, though I know he doesn't have the experience.

    My husband (we share the same political views, thank heavens), points out that if Obama gets the nomination, the Dems are sunk: Once it gets to the national level, sez the spouse, B.O. won't be electable. Then we'll get whatever Republican is around, despite deep anger right now at Bush and the Iraq War mess.

    McCain would probably at least get us out of the war. Oh, I don't know. Que sera, sera.

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  8. Cheer up, Susan! If Obama gets the nomination there are pretty good odds he'd win handily no matter what the GOP does. The press will monitor any and all statements for any hint of racism, intended or unintended. (Witness coverage of Bill Clinton's otherwise unremarkable comment about Obama's fairy tale campaign.) McCain is over 70 and looks it. Standing next to Obama on stage will remind people that they better like his VP choice because that is who they are going to end up with as President.

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  9. Yes, SB, as I wrote in a previous comment to a post on this topic, the Americans won't vote for a woman or a black guy as president whatever their provenance or politics, so if either of them (Hillary or Barak) wins the nomination, the republicans are back. That's my twopennorth.

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  10. It's possible NH was rigged since it uses electronic voting which is regarded as highly questionable by many.
    It's baffling she won NH, i thought Obama would have been a shoo in there even more than Iowa. Such an unpredictable strange country, i'm never betting on American politics again.

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  11. Why is it so baffling? She was well ahead in NH in almost every poll ever taken up to the Iowa caucus. A couple of the pollsters after the Iowa caucus showed a dead heat (which it was). The others showed Obama pulling ahead but the margin of error was 4 or 5 points. Some of them did not poll after the debate, when he did ok but not great. His comment at the debate about her popularity cost him votes among women and independents. Almost half the voters decided within the last 72 hours (and probably changed their minds 6 times during that time). Last minute deciders are not partisans - they sway this way and that. An enormous percentage decided in the final day while tapes of the sob were played endlessly and men in the press witheringly decried her emotionalism. And people wonder why her numbers among female voters surged? Last minute deciders went almost entirely for HRC, a lemming-like tendency to overwhelmingly cut for one candidate above all others that has a long history in American politics.

    While I oppose electronic ballots, one has to be a lunatic to believe that Diebold is in cahoots with the Clintons or that they are somehow so threatened by the idea of Obama as President that they rigged it. He certainly poses no threat to them. They don't care who is President, certainly not a relative lightweight like him. They'll still be in business when he or she is long gone. If there was some sort of great conspiracy, then all of the networks and polling organizations would have to have been involved because they conducted the exit interviews, not with the machines, but withreal live voters. The exit polls mirrored the actual voting results.

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  12. It's baffling because every poll, media outlet and newspaper i read was confident of an Obama victory. I guess i must have missed the polls you read.

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  13. Whatever about racist or sexist commentary, I've heard some pretty ageist stuff about McCain. For example, that wonk who turns up on Newsnight once in a while, Frank Luntz, said that McCain is so old it takes him an hour and a half to watch 60 Minutes. I didn't laugh, of course.

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  14. I hope i look as good as McCain when i'm 70 odd.

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  15. I hope I look as good when I'm fifty.

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  16. On Hillary's tears, I like what Susan B says above. But also on the 10th, E. Ethelbert Miller had this: Quote of the Day at his blog:

    What was moving her so deeply was her recognition that the country was failing to grasp how much it needs her. In a weirdly narcissistic way, she was crying for us. But it was grimly typical of her that what finally made her break down was the prospect of losing.

    - Maureen Dowd (NY Times, 1-9-08)


    I am a closet liberal who usually votes conservatively. It aligns with being a poet, because I always look at things differently, looking for improvement or better definitions, different ways of skinning a cat, not just the way we do it now. But the liberal must be legit. I voted for Gore against Bush. Four years later,I wanted to vote against Bush again, but could not vote for Kerry, who isn't even liberal. He hardly had a heartfelt platform at all, it seemed.

    Today the Democrats have another golden chance to do something, and we have the race reduced to Obama versus Hillary. I don't want to vote for either of them. And it has nothing to do with gender or race, because Condi's looking pretty good at this point, yet she's not even in the race.

    I would love to vote for Edwards, would love to consider him legit, but here is the picture I have of him: Edwards touts his energy efficient home. The picture there is of him looking up into the sky or rafters or something. Why doesn't he just climb a tree? Liberal change does not mean there's a real pie in the sky. Then Kerry comes out and shows me why I did not vote for him once again, snubs his 2004 running mate, the guy he hand picked for us, and endorces Obama. What? And, by the way, if Kerry had such an important agenda, why is he not running? Answer? Because there was no good reason after all that he should have been president.

    It looks like Hillary will win on the Democrat side at this point. So who can beat her?

    On the Republican side, what's his name Mitt Romney who came here to Massachusetts to get a governorship on his resume doesn't do too much damage when in office, and is flexible when his philosophies don't work in the real world. But is the presidency too big for him? Would his demise be similar to Bush's in the sense of not being strong enough politically to handle it when the going gets tough. And what a hypothetical question, because he cannot beat Hillary anyway.

    It looks like McCain would get my vote at this point, and in a sense because the country will be in good hands. I'm old enough to know that there is no one who will agree with me on even the most important points. When philosophies differ, we need to look at our paychecks and how people are being treated. McCain would probably be a pretty good president in these senses. And, even though the polls now show him a couple points behind Hillary one-on-one, it seems he can make up that difference. The question would be his health--and to me this means whether he could win, not whether he would get my vote.

    I'm one American, and I'm open.

    Yours,
    Rus

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  17. I want McCain.

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  18. I'm kidding of course.

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  19. Please... not a Maureen Dowd quote! Is anyone actually taking this god-awful gossip columnist seriously? Dowd is incredibly pissed off at the world because everyone isn't talking about the really important stuff.... namely Maureen Dowd.

    And they don't use electronic voting in New Hampshire. They use paper ballots that are read by a scanner.

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