Thursday, January 31, 2008

Sian Weight Loss Shock Horror

I have at last empirical evidence that I am, indeed, the only person that watches BBC Breakfast. In the normal course of events a shocking weight loss, suggesting anorexia, in a TV presenter would be hitting the tabloid headlines and bringing out all the fake doctors to say what's wrong with the poor dear. That, however, is exactly what has happened to Sian Williams and nobody has noticed except me, because, of course, nobody else is watching. It is, as ever, a lonely but exhilarating feeling being B.Appleyard.

23 comments:

  1. You're sure that someone isn't replacing your telly with a slightly narrower one each day.
    And anyway how the heavens can you tell she's narrowing, when the only part of the woman you can see are wrists collar and face. The rest of her merges, red on red with the BBC pub seat.

    ReplyDelete
  2. As far as I remember, pregnancy goes something like this: you get bigger and bigger and bigger, then you have the baby and suddenly you are small again. Or am I missing something here?

    ReplyDelete
  3. you're missing something, sophie - that item is dated six years ago.

    sorry, Sian who?

    ReplyDelete
  4. It's not that she's 'small again', she's very very thin, unprecedentedly so

    ReplyDelete
  5. Yes, I think you may be missing something, Sophie. I think it may go something like this: you get bigger and bigger and bigger, then you have the baby and then you get so depressed that your body is a complete mess that you start wearing baggy clothing and comfort-eating and watching daytime television in between changing nappies, breast-feeding and hallucinating from lack of sleep. In other words, you let yourself go (I think that's the expression). Of course, this doesn't happen to every woman. Those with nannies, personal trainers and plastic surgeons on retainers appear in Hello magazine two weeks later looking like a Barbie Doll.

    ReplyDelete
  6. ...if the phone rings in the next ten minutes, Bryan, I'll have a fiver on it being Heat magazine.

    (unless your offering better than 100-1 odds on Nuts)

    ReplyDelete
  7. I've often wondered what it must be like being B. Appleyard.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Ian, I spotted that the article was dated 31st January and so didn't bother to look at the year.... I stand corrected.

    And Neil, you are right about the shapeless clothing. After my daughter was born I developed an unnaturally close relationship with my dressing gown. I also quickly realised that watching daytime television was a terrible waste of valuable sleeping time.

    As I get older, I think sleep is the answer to an awful lot of problems. Perhaps that is what is missing in Sian's life - as well as food, obviously.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I'm afraid Bryan you are not alone. I'm a watcher. On the subject of Sian's weight - I've witnessed a couple of yo-yos in her BBC Breakfast stint, and don't think this one's anything to worry about.

    I find I spend most of my early mornings shouting things at Bill Turnbull, who has become television's most irritating person. Whoever put him on Strictly Come Dancing needs shooting.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Sophie, you're so right - sleep is the answer (and who cares what the question is?)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Yup: Sleep, sex, chocolate. The order changes depending on how old your kids are. Mine are teenagers, so maybe I'd better add 'tequila.'

    ReplyDelete
  12. Indeed, sleep is where it's at. I have two small children. I fantasize more about sleep these days than sex. Is it possible to sleep with one's eyes open? That would be a very handy skill.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Yes, Trevor McDonald does it - even when he's reading the News.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Is it possible to sleep with one's eyes open?

    No, Neil, but as you get older, you learn how to enjoy sex with your eyes closed.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I like it, Peter. Many possible meanings? I won't guess at any of them.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Weight loss industry will focus on the way people should feel while doing it, in order to achieve better results and stay healthy all the time. Being healthy and thin is not a dream, it should be something, that is a reasonable and easy to be done.

    The modern obsession with a thin body is another problem that women face now a days. Women try everything in order to get this extra pounds off, things like pills, patches, diet, hunger, exercises and all kind of weight loss products.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I NOTICED!!!! she has lost a LOT of weight and looks skeletal

    ReplyDelete
  18. I have thought for some time that she is anorexic. At last someone who has also noticed. I wanted to write to the bbc, is that a good idea?

    ReplyDelete
  19. great post, nice. you are missing something.....

    ReplyDelete
  20. Now, Sian Williams... you are certainly NOT the only watching the incredible shrinking woman!! Given that TV is supposed to add 10 pounds I dread to think how much Ms Williams waist is now or if she is a size zero or even over 7 stones. I think she must shop in Mothercare childs range of clothes! I pine for the old even sexy Sian that used to grace our screens voluptuously (well not really.. I was off on a fantasy jaunt then) ...

    ReplyDelete
  21. Now, Sian Williams... you are certainly NOT the only watching the incredible shrinking woman!! Given that TV is supposed to add 10 pounds I dread to think how much Ms Williams waist is now or if she is a size zero or even over 7 stones. I think she must shop in Mothercare childs range of clothes! I pine for the old even sexy Sian that used to grace our screens voluptuously (well not really.. I was off on a fantasy jaunt then) ...

    ReplyDelete
  22. No, you are not on your own in this observation! We watch BBC Breakfst with increasing consternation every time we see Ms Williams getting thinner. Talk about shock when she claimed to be 5'3 and 9 stone!!! Nooooooo 7 stone we reckon

    ReplyDelete