Sunday, July 13, 2008

Happiness is...

... listening to the Brandenburg Concertos. Unless you know better.

9 comments:

  1. I was introduced to these when nobbut a lad on an album by Walter Carlos, now known as Wendy. You probably know her. I once watched a man play a didjeridoo on an Oxford street and a kid to the side of me was heard to say he could easily do that on his Casio. He missed the point. As long as it's got soul I don't care what it's called or where it came from. Nouvelles Cordes Anciennes is doing it for me right now.

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  2. I expect it's more than that. I don't think it would be the same listening experience while waiting to see the dentist, or facing half a day's work an half hour before deadline.

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  3. Try Haydn's Seven Last Words, expresses the anguish felt by every mother whose child pre deceases them, sublime, heartbreaking.

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  4. Good malty, but happiness was the key word. What about this from a joyous Paris production of Rameau's last great opera-ballet Les Indes Galantes - try to keep your foot still. You see - you can't!
    Mahlerman

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  5. Sorry - forgot to paste!
    Mahlerman
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIi_TvIvUdk

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  6. I may have missed the point, of course, but I am not quite sure why a piece of musics subject matter somber, serious or otherwise should affect the listening experience, that is happy enjoyment, I care not whether it is a requiem or say Haydn's Creation or Purcell's Fairy Queen, both truly joyous pieces, they can instill in me feelings of happiness, as can music played by a particular artist, I can happily listen to John Ogden playing any piano piece. If I can connect with the music I am happy to listen to it.

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  7. No malty, you didn't miss the point, I did. I have always responded, in a rather literal way, to my sensibilities when listening to a piece of music or, for that matter, reading a book. It had never crossed my mind that a state of 'happiness' could be induced by listening to, say, a sombre piece of music, as it is so far removed from my own experience.
    I will always remember Charles de Gaulle's response when asked by an inquisitor 'are you happy?'
    'Are you mad' he replied
    Mahlerman

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